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26
Jul
2016

Jubilee of Youth - World Youth Day

26 July 2016 - 31 July 2016 (Termin in Kalender eintragen)

Krakow

To conclude on the XVIII Sunday of Ordinary Time

Jubilee for young people.
World Youth Day in Krakow, Poland. 

HOLY MASS FOR WORLD YOUTH DAY

HOMILY OF THE HOLY FATHER

Campus Misericordiae - Kraków
Sunday, 31 July 2016

 

Dear young people, you have come to Krakow to meet Jesus.  Today’s Gospel speaks to us of just such a meeting between Jesus and a man named Zacchaeus, in Jericho (cf. Lk 19:1-10).   There Jesus does not simply preach or greet people; as the Evangelist tells us, he passed through the city (v. 1).  In other words, Jesus wants to draw near to us personally, to accompany our journey to its end, so that his life and our life can truly meet.

An amazing encounter then takes place, with Zacchaeus, the chief “publican” or tax collector.  Zacchaeus was thus a wealthy collaborator of the hated Roman occupiers, someone who exploited his own people, someone who, because of his ill repute, could not even approach the Master.  His encounter with Jesus changed his life, just as it has changed, and can daily still change, each of our lives.  But Zacchaeus had to face a number of obstacles in order to meet Jesus.  It was not easy for him; he had to face a number of obstacles. At least three of these can also say something to us.

The first obstacle is smallness of stature.  Zacchaeus couldn’t see the Master because he was little.  Even today we can risk not getting close to Jesus because we don’t feel big enough, because we don’t think ourselves worthy.  This is a great temptation; it has to do not only with self-esteem, but with faith itself.  For faith tells us that we are “children of God… that is what we are” (1 Jn 3:1).  We have been created in God’s own image; Jesus has taken upon himself our humanity and his heart will never be separated from us; the Holy Spirit wants to dwell within us.  We have been called to be happy for ever with God! 

That is our real “stature”, our spiritual identity: we are God’s beloved children, always.  So you can see that not to accept ourselves, to live glumly, to be negative, means not to recognize our deepest identity.  It is like walking away when God wants to look at me, trying to spoil his dream for me.  God loves us the way we are, and no sin, fault or mistake of ours makes him change his mind.  As far as Jesus is concerned – as the Gospel shows – no one is unworthy of, or far from, his thoughts.  No one is insignificant.  He loves all of us with a special love; for him all of us are important: you are important!  God counts on you for what you are, not for what you possess.  In his eyes the clothes you wear or the kind of cell phone you use are of absolutely no concern.  He doesn’t care whether you are stylish or not; he cares about you, just as you are!  In his eyes, you are precious, and your value is inestimable.

At times in our lives, we aim lower rather than higher.  At those times, it is good to realize that God remains faithful, even obstinate, in his love for us.  The fact is, he loves us even more than we love ourselves.  He believes in us even more than we believe in ourselves.  He is always “cheering us on”; he is our biggest fan.  He is there for us, waiting with patience and hope, even when we turn in on ourselves and brood over our troubles and past injuries.  But such brooding is unworthy of our spiritual stature!  It is a kind of virus infecting and blocking everything; it closes doors and prevents us from getting up and starting over.  God, on the other hand, is hopelessly hopeful!  He believes that we can always get up, and he hates to see us glum and gloomy.  It is sad to see young people who are glum.  Because we are always his beloved sons and daughters.  Let us be mindful of this at the dawn of each new day.  It will do us good to pray every morning: “Lord, I thank you for loving me; I am sure that you love me; help me to be in love with my own life!”  Not with my faults, that need to be corrected, but with life itself, which is a great gift, for it is a time to love and to be loved.

Zacchaeus faced a second obstacle in meeting Jesus: the paralysis of shame.  We spoke a little about this yesterday.  We can imagine what was going on in his heart before he climbed that sycamore.  It must have been quite a struggle – on one hand, a healthy curiosity and desire to know Jesus; on the other, the risk of appearing completely ridiculous.  Zacchaeus was public figure, a man of power, but deeply hated.  He knew that, in trying to climb that tree, he would have become a laughingstock to all.  Yet he mastered his shame, because the attraction of Jesus was more powerful.  You know what happens when someone is so attractive that we fall in love with them: we end up ready to do things we would never have even thought of doing.  Something similar took place in the heart of Zacchaeus, when he realized that Jesus was so important that he would do anything for him, since Jesus alone could pull him out of the mire of sin and discontent.  The paralysis of shame did not have the upper hand.  The Gospel tells us that Zacchaeus “ran ahead”, “climbed” the tree, and then, when Jesus called him, he “hurried down” (vv. 4, 6).  He took a risk, he put his life on the line.  For us too, this is the secret of joy: not to stifle a healthy curiosity, but to take a risk, because life is not meant to be tucked away.  When it comes to Jesus, we cannot sit around waiting with arms folded; he offers us life – we can’t respond by thinking about it or “texting” a few words!

Dear young friends, don’t be ashamed to bring everything to the Lord in confession, especially your weaknesses, your struggles and your sins.  He will surprise you with his forgiveness and his peace.  Don’t be afraid to say “yes” to him with all your heart, to respond generously and to follow him!  Don’t let your soul grow numb, but aim for the goal of a beautiful love which also demands sacrifice.  Say a firm “no” to the narcotic of success at any cost and the sedative of worrying only about yourself and your own comfort.

After his small stature, after the paralysis of shame, there was a third obstacle that Zacchaeus had to face.  It was no longer an interior one, but was all around him.  It was the grumbling of the crowd, who first blocked him and then criticized him: How could Jesus have entered his house, the house of a sinner!  How truly hard it is to welcome Jesus, how hard it is to accept a “God who is rich in mercy” (Eph 2:4)!  People will try to block you, to make you think that God is distant, rigid and insensitive, good to the good and bad to the bad.  Instead, our heavenly Father “makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good” (Mt 5:45).  He demands of us real courage: the courage to be more powerful than evil by loving everyone, even our enemies.  People may laugh at you because you believe in the gentle and unassuming power of mercy.  But do not be afraid.  Think of the motto of these days: “Blessed are the merciful, for they will receive mercy” (Mt 5:7).  People may judge you to be dreamers, because you believe in a new humanity, one that rejects hatred between peoples, one that refuses to see borders as barriers and can cherish its own traditions without being self-centred or small-minded.  Don’t be discouraged: with a smile and open arms, you proclaim hope and you are a blessing for our one human family, which here you represent so beautifully!

That day the crowd judged Zacchaeus; they looked him over, up and down.  But Jesus did otherwise: he gazed up at him (v. 5).  Jesus looks beyond the faults and sees the person.  He does not halt before bygone evil, but sees future good.  His gaze remains constant, even when it is not met; it seeks the way of unity and communion.  In no case does it halt at appearances, but looks to the heart.  Jesus looks to our hearts, your heart, my heart.  With this gaze of Jesus, you can help bring about another humanity, without looking for acknowledgement but seeking goodness for its own sake, content to maintain a pure heart and to fight peaceably for honesty and justice.  Don’t stop at the surface of things; distrust the worldly cult of appearances, cosmetic attempts to improve our looks.  Instead, “download” the best “link” of all, that of a heart which sees and transmits goodness without growing weary.  The joy that you have freely received from God, please, freely give away (cf. Mt 10:8): so many people are waiting for it!  So many are waiting for it from you.  

Finally let us listen to the words that Jesus spoke to Zacchaeus, which to be seem meant for us today, for each one of us: “Come down, for I must stay at your house today” (v. 5).  “Come down, for I must stay with you today.  Open to me the door of your heart”.  Jesus extends the same invitation to you: “I must stay at your house today”.  We can say that World Youth Day begins today and continues tomorrow, in your homes, since that is where Jesus wants to meet you from now on. The Lord doesn’t want to remain in this beautiful city, or in cherished memories alone.  He wants to enter your homes, to dwell in your daily lives: in your studies, your first years of work, your friendships and affections, your hopes and dreams.  How greatly he desires that you bring all this to him in prayer!  How much he hopes that, in all the “contacts” and “chats” of each day, pride of place be given to the golden thread of prayer!  How much he wants his word to be able to speak to you day after day, so that you can make his Gospel your own, so that it can serve as a compass for you on the highways of life!

In asking to come to your house, Jesus calls you, as he did Zacchaeus, by name.  All of us, Jesus calls by name.  Your name is precious to him.  The name “Zacchaeus” would have made people back the think of the remembrance of God.  Trust the memory of God: his memory is not a “hard disk” that “saves” and “archives” all our data, his memory is a heart filled with tender compassion, one that finds joy in “erasing” in us every trace of evil.  May we too now try to imitate the faithful memory of God and treasure the good things we have received in these days.  In silence, let us remember this encounter, let us preserve the memory of the presence of God and his word, and let us listen once more to the voice of Jesus as he calls us by name.  So let us now pray silently, remembering and thanking the Lord wanted us to be here and has come here to meet us.

 

 

 

APOSTOLIC JOURNEY OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS 
TO POLAND
ON THE OCCASION OF THE XXXI WORLD YOUTH DAY
 
(27-31 JULY 2016)

PRAYER VIGIL WITH THE YOUNG PEOPLE

ADDRESS OF THE HOLY FATHER

Campus Misericordiae, Kraków
Saturday, 30 July 2016

 

Dear Young Friends, good evening!

It is good to be here with you at this Prayer Vigil!

At the end of her powerful and moving witness, Rand asked something of us.  She said: “I earnestly ask you to pray for my beloved country”.  Her story, involving war, grief and loss, ended with a request for prayers.  Is there a better way for us to begin our vigil than by praying?

We have come here from different parts of the world, from different continents, countries, languages, cultures and peoples.  Some of us are sons and daughters of nations that may be at odds and engaged in various conflicts or even open war.  Others of us come from countries that may be at “peace”, free of war and conflict, where most of the terrible things occurring in our world are simply a story on the evening news.  But think about it.  For us, here, today, coming from different parts of the world, the suffering and the wars that many young people experience are no longer anonymous, something we read about in the papers.  They have a name, they have a face, they have a story, they are close at hand.  Today the war in Syria has caused pain and suffering for so many people, for so many young people like our brave friend Rand, who has come here and asked us to pray for her beloved country.

Some situations seem distant until in some way we touch them.  We don’t appreciate certain things because we only see them on the screen of a cell phone or a computer.  But when we come into contact with life, with people’s lives, not just images on a screen, something powerful happens.  We all feel the need to get involved.  To see that there are no more “forgotten cities”, to use Rand’s words, or brothers and sisters of ours “surrounded by death and killing”, completely helpless.  Dear friends, I ask that we join in prayer for the sufferings of all the victims of war, of this war today in the world.  Once and for all, may we realize that nothing justifies shedding the blood of a brother or sister; that nothing is more precious than the person next to us.  In asking you to pray for this, I would also like to thank Natalia and Miguel for sharing their own battles and inner conflicts.  You told us about your struggles, and about how you succeeded in overcoming them.  Both of you are a living sign of what God’s mercy wants to accomplish in us.

This is no time for denouncing anyone or fighting.  We do not want to tear down, we do not want to give insult.  We have no desire to conquer hatred with more hatred, violence with more violence, terror with more terror.  We are here today because the Lord has called us together.  Our response to a world at war has a name: its name is fraternity, its name is brotherhood, its name is communion, its name is family.  We celebrate the fact that coming from different cultures, we have come together to pray.  Let our best word, our best argument, be our unity in prayer.  Let us take a moment of silence and pray.  Let us place before the Lord these testimonies of our friends, and let us identify with those for whom “the family is a meaningless concept, the home only a place to sleep and eat”, and with those who live with the fear that their mistakes and sins have made them outcasts.  Let us also place before the Lord your own “battles”, our “battles”, the interior struggles that each carries in his or her heart.  And so, to live as a family, in fraternity, I invite all of you together to stand, to take each other’s hand and to pray in silence.  All of us.  

(SILENCE)

As we were praying, I thought of the Apostles on the day of Pentecost.  Picturing them can help us come to appreciate all that God dreams of accomplishing in our lives, in us and with us.  That day, the disciples were together behind locked doors, out of fear.  They felt threatened, surrounded by an atmosphere of persecution that had cornered them in a little room and left them silent and paralyzed.  Fear had taken hold of them.  Then, in that situation, something spectacular, something grandiose, occurred.  The Holy Spirit and tongues as of fire came to rest upon each of them, propelling them towards an undreamt-of adventure.  This brings about a total change!

We have heard three testimonies.  Our hearts were touched by their stories, their lives.  We have seen how, like the disciples, they experienced similar moments, living through times of great fear, when it seemed like everything was falling apart.  The fear and anguish born of knowing that leaving home might mean never again seeing their loved ones, the fear of not feeling appreciated or loved, the fear of having no choices.  They shared with us the same experience the disciples had; they felt the kind of fear that only leads to one thing.  Where does fear lead us?  The feeling of being closed in on oneself, trapped.  Once we feel that way, our fear starts to fester and is inevitably joined by its “twin sister”, paralysis: the feeling of being paralyzed.  Thinking that in this world, in our cities and our communities, there is no longer any room to grow, to dream, to create, to gaze at new horizons – in a word to live – is one of the worst things that can happen to us in life, and especially at a younger age.  When we are paralyzed, we miss the magic of encountering others, making friends, sharing dreams, walking at the side of others.  This paralysis distances us from others, it prevents us from taking each other’s hand, as we saw [on the stage], all closed within the small rooms of glass.

But in life there is another, even more dangerous, kind of paralysis.  It is not easy to put our finger on it.  I like to describe it as the paralysis that comes from confusing happiness with a sofa.  In other words, to think that in order to be happy all we need is a good sofa.  A sofa that makes us feel comfortable, calm, safe.  A sofa like one of those we have nowadays with a built-in massage unit to put us to sleep.  A sofa that promises us hours of comfort so we can escape to the world of videogames and spend all kinds of time in front of a computer screen.  A sofa that keeps us safe from any kind of pain and fear.  A sofa that allows us to stay home without needing to work at, or worry about, anything.  “Sofa-happiness”!  That is probably the most harmful and insidious form of paralysis, which can cause the greatest harm to young people.  And why does this happen Father?  Because, little by little, without even realizing it, we start to nod off, to grow drowsy and dull.  The other day, I spoke about young people who go into retirement at the age of 20; today I speak about young persons who nod off, grow drowsy and dull, while others – perhaps more alert than we are, but not necessarily better – decide our future for us.  For many people in fact, it is much easier and better to have drowsy and dull kids who confuse happiness with a sofa.  For many people, that is more convenient than having young people who are alert and searching, trying to respond to God’s dream and to all the restlessness present in the human heart.  I ask you: do you want to be young people who nod off, who are drowsy and dull?  [No!]  Do you want others to decide your future for you?  [No!]  Do you want to be free?  [Yes!]  Do you want to be alert?  [Yes!]  Do you want to work hard for your future?  [Yes!]   You don’t seem very convinced…  Do you want to work hard for your future?  [Yes!]

The truth, though, is something else.  Dear young people, we didn’t come into this work to “vegetate”, to take it easy, to make our lives a comfortable sofa to fall asleep on.  No, we came for another reason: to leave a mark.  It is very sad to pass through life without leaving a mark.  But when we opt for ease and convenience, for confusing happiness with consumption, then we end up paying a high price indeed: we lose our freedom.  We are not free to leave a mark.  We lose our freedom.  This is the high price we pay.  There are so many people who do not want the young to be free; there are so many people who do not wish you well, who want you to be drowsy and dull, and never free!  No, this must not be so!  We must defend our freedom!  

This is itself a great form of paralysis, whenever we start thinking that happiness is the same as comfort and convenience, that being happy means going through life asleep or on tranquillizers, that the only way to be happy is to live in a haze.  Certainly, drugs are bad, but there are plenty of other socially acceptable drugs, that can end up enslaving us just the same.  One way or the other, they rob us of our greatest treasure: our freedom.  They strip us of our freedom.

My friends, Jesus is the Lord of risk, he is the Lord of the eternal “more”.  Jesus is not the Lord of comfort, security and ease.  Following Jesus demands a good dose of courage, a readiness to trade in the sofa for a pair of walking shoes and to set out on new and uncharted paths.  To blaze trails that open up new horizons capable of spreading joy, the joy that is born of God’s love and wells up in your hearts with every act of mercy.  To take the path of the “craziness” of our God, who teaches us to encounter him in the hungry, the thirsty, the naked, the sick, the friend in trouble, the prisoner, the refugee and the migrant, and our neighbours who feel abandoned.  To take the path of our God, who encourages us to be politicians, thinkers, social activists.  The God who encourages us to devise an economy marked by greater solidarity than our own.  In all the settings in which you find yourselves, God’s love invites you bring the Good News, making of your own lives a gift to him and to others.  This means being courageous, this means being free!  

You might say to me: Father, that is not for everybody, but just for a chosen few.  True, and those chosen are all who are ready to share their lives with others.  Just as the Holy Spirit transformed the hearts of the disciples on the day of Pentecost, and they were paralyzed, so he did with our friends who shared their testimonies.  I will use your own words, Miguel.  You told us that in the “Facenda” on the day they entrusted you with the responsibility for helping make the house run better, you began to understand that God was asking something of you.  That is when things began to change.

That is the secret, dear friends, and all of us are called to share in it.  God expects something from you.  Have you understood this?  God expects something from you, God wants something from you.  God hopes in you.  God comes to break down all our fences.  He comes to open the doors of our lives, our dreams, our ways of seeing things.  God comes to break open everything that keeps you closed in.  He is encouraging you to dream.  He wants to make you see that, with you, the world can be different.  For the fact is, unless you offer the best of yourselves, the world will never be different.  This is the challenge.

The times we live in do not call for young “couch potatoes”, but for young people with shoes, or better, boots laced.  The times we live in require only active players on the field, and there is no room for those who sit on the bench.  Today’s world demands that you be a protagonist of history because life is always beautiful when we choose to live it fully, when we choose to leave a mark.  History today calls us to defend our dignity and not to let others decide our future.  No!  We must decide our future, you must decide your future!  As he did on Pentecost, the Lord wants to work one of the greatest miracles we can experience; he wants to turn your hands, my hands, our hands, into signs of reconciliation, of communion, of creation.  He wants your hands to continue building the world of today.  And he wants to build that world with you.  And what is your response?  Yes or no?  [Yes!]

You might say to me: Father, but I have my limits, I am a sinner, what can I do?  When the Lord calls us, he doesn’t worry about what we are, what we have been, or what we have done or not done.  Quite the opposite.  When he calls us, he is thinking about everything we have to give, all the love we are capable of spreading.  His bets are on the future, on tomorrow.  Jesus is pointing you to the future, and never to the museum.

So today, my friends, Jesus is inviting you, calling you, to leave your mark on life, to leave a mark on history, your own and that of many others as well.

Life nowadays tells us that it is much easier to concentrate on what divides us, what keeps us apart.  People try to make us believe that being closed in on ourselves is the best way to keep safe from harm.  Today, we adults need you to teach us, as you are doing today, how to live in diversity, in dialogue, to experience multiculturalism not as a threat but an opportunity.  You are an opportunity for the future.  Have the courage to teach us, have the courage to show us that it is easier to build bridges than walls!  We need to learn this.  Together we ask that you challenge us to take the path of fraternity.  May you point the finger at us, if we choose the path of walls, the path of enmity, the path of war.  To build bridges… Do you know the first bridge that has to be built?  It is a bridge that we can build here and now – by reaching out and taking each other’s hand.  Come on, build it now.  Build this human bridge, take each other’s hand, all of you: it is the first of bridges, it is the human bridge, it is the first, it is the model.  There is always a risk, as I said the other day, of offering your hand and no one taking it.  But in life we need to take a risk, for the person who does not take a risk never wins.  With this bridge we can move forwards.  Here, this is the primordial bridge: take each other’s hand.  Thank you.  This is a great bridge of brotherhood, and would that the powers of this world might learn to build it… not for pictures and ulterior motives, but for building ever bigger bridges.  May this human bridge be the beginning of many, many others; in that way, it will leave a mark.

Today Jesus, who is the way, the truth and the life, is calling you, you, and you to leave your mark on history.  He, who is life, is asking each of you to leave a mark that brings life to your own history and that of many others.  He, who is truth, is asking you to abandon the paths of rejection, division and emptiness.  Are you up to this?  [Yes!]  Are you up to this?  [Yes!]  What answer will you give, and I’d like to see it, with your hands and with your feet, to the Lord, who is the way, the truth and the life?  Are you up to this?  [Yes!]  May the Lord bless your dreams.  Thank you!

 

 

 

APOSTOLIC JOURNEY OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS 
TO POLAND
ON THE OCCASION OF THE XXXI WORLD YOUTH DAY
 
(27-31 JULY 2016)

WAY OF THE CROSS WITH THE YOUNG PEOPLE

ADDRESS OF THE HOLY FATHER

Jordan Park in Błonia, Kraków
Friday, 29 July 2016

 

I was hungry and you gave me food, 
I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, 
I was a stranger and you welcomed me, 
I was naked and you gave me clothing, 
I was sick and you took care of me, 
I was in prison and you visited me (Mt 
25:35-36).

These words of Jesus answer the question that arises so often in our minds and hearts:  “Where is God?”  Where is God, if evil is present in our world, if there are men and women who are hungry and thirsty, homeless, exiles and refugees?  Where is God, when innocent persons die as a result of violence, terrorism and war?  Where is God, when cruel diseases break the bonds of life and affection?   Or when children are exploited and demeaned, and they too suffer from grave illness?  Where is God, amid the anguish of those who doubt and are troubled in spirit?  These are questions that humanly speaking have no answer.  We can only look to Jesus and ask him.   And Jesus’ answer is this: “God is in them”.  Jesus is in them; he suffers in them and deeply identifies with each of them.  He is so closely united to them as to form with them, as it were, “one body”.

Jesus himself chose to identify with these our brothers and sisters enduring pain and anguish by agreeing to tread the “way of sorrows” that led to Calvary.  By dying on the cross, he surrendered himself into to the hands of the Father, taking upon himself and in himself, with self-sacrificing love, the physical, moral and spiritual wounds of all humanity.  By embracing the wood of the cross, Jesus embraced the nakedness, the hunger and thirst, the loneliness, pain and death of men and women of all times.  Tonight Jesus, and we with him, embrace with particular love our brothers and sisters from Syria who have fled from the war.  We greet them and we welcome them with fraternal affection and friendship.

By following Jesus along the Way of the Cross, we have once again realized the importance of imitating him through the fourteenworks of mercy.  These help us to be open to God’s mercy, to implore the grace to appreciate that without mercy we can do nothing; without mercy, neither I nor you nor any of us can do a thing.  Let us first consider the seven corporal works of mercy: feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, clothing the naked, sheltering the homeless, visiting the sick and those in prison, and burying the dead.  Freely we have received, so freely let us give.  We are called to serve the crucified Jesus in all those who are marginalized, to touch his sacred flesh in those who are disadvantaged, in those who hunger and thirst, in the naked and imprisoned, the sick and unemployed, in those who are persecuted, refugees and migrants.  There we find our God; there we touch the Lord.  Jesus himself told us this when he explained the criterion on which we will be judged: whenever we do these things to the least of our brothers and sisters, we do them to him (cf. Mt 25:31-46).

After the corporal works of mercy come the spiritual works: counselling the doubtful, instructing the ignorant, admonishing sinners, consoling the afflicted, pardoning offences, bearing wrongs patiently, praying for the living and the dead.  In welcoming the outcast who suffer physically and in welcoming sinners who suffer spiritually, our credibility as Christians is at stake.  In welcoming the outcast who suffer physically and in welcoming sinners who suffer spiritually, our credibility as Christians is at stake.  Not in ideas, but in our actions.

Humanity today needs men and women, and especially young people like yourselves, who do not wish to live their lives “halfway”, young people ready to spend their lives freely in service to those of their brothers and sisters who are poorest and most vulnerable, in imitation of Christ who gave himself completely for our salvation.  In the face of evil, suffering and sin, the only response possible for a disciple of Jesus is the gift of self, even of one’s own life, in imitation of Christ; it is the attitude of service.  Unless those who call themselves Christians live to serve, their lives serve no good purpose.  By their lives, they deny Jesus Christ.

This evening, dear friends, the Lord once more asks you to be in the forefront of serving others.  He wants to make of you a concrete response to the needs and sufferings of humanity.  He wants you to be signs of his merciful love for our time!  To enable you to carry out this mission, he shows you the way of personal commitment and self-sacrifice.  It is the Way of the Cross.  The Way of the Cross is the way of fidelity in following Jesus to the end, in the often dramatic situations of everyday life.  It is a way that fears no lack of success, ostracism or solitude, because it fills ours hearts with the fullness of Jesus.  The Way of the Cross is the way of God’s own life, his “style”, which Jesus brings even to the pathways of a society at times divided, unjust and corrupt.

The Way of the Cross is not an exercise in sadomasochism; the Way of the Cross alone defeats sin, evil and death, for it leads to the radiant light of Christ’s resurrection and opens the horizons of a new and fuller life.  It is the way of hope, the way of the future.  Those who take up this way with generosity and faith give hope to the future and to humanity.  Those who take up this way with generosity and faith sow seeds of hope.  I want you to be sowers of hope.

Dear young people, on that Good Friday many disciples went back crestfallen to their homes.  Others chose to go out to the country to forget the cross.  I ask you: but I want each of you to answer in silence in the depths of your heart.  How do you want to go back this evening to your own homes, to the places where you are staying, to your tents?  How do you want to go back this evening to be alone with your thoughts?  The world is watching us.  Each of you has to answer the challenge that this question sets before you.

 

 

 

APOSTOLIC JOURNEY OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS 
TO POLAND
ON THE OCCASION OF THE XXXI WORLD YOUTH DAY
 
(27-31 JULY 2016)

WELCOMING CEREMONY BY THE YOUNG PEOPLE OF WYD

ADDRESS OF THE HOLY FATHER

Jordan Park, Błonia, Kraków
Thursday, 28 July 2016

 

Dear Young Friends, good evening!

 

At last we are together! Thank you for your warm welcome! I thank Cardinal Dziwisz, the bishops, priests, men and women religious, the seminarians, lay-faithful, and those who have accompanied you. I am also grateful to all those who made it possible for us to be here today, who “went the extra mile” so that we could celebrate our faith. Today, all of us together, are celebrating our faith!

 

In this, the land of his birth, I especially want to thank Saint John Paul II [loud applause] – louder, louder – who first came up with the idea of these meetings and gave them such momentum. From his place in heaven, he is with us and he sees all of you: so many young people from such a variety of nations, cultures and languages but with one aim, that of celebrating Jesus who is living in our midst. Do you understand this? To celebrate Jesus who is living in our midst! To say that Jesus is alive means to rekindle our enthusiasm in following him, to renew our passionate desire to be his disciples. What better opportunity to renew our friendship with Jesus than by building friendships among yourselves! What better way to build our friendship with Jesus than by sharing him with others! What better way to experience the contagious joy of the Gospel than by striving to bring the Good News to all kinds of painful and difficult situations!

 

And it is Jesus who has called us to this Thirty-first World Youth Day. Jesus tells us: “Blessed are the merciful, for they shall find mercy” (Mt 5:7). Blessed indeed are they who can forgive, who show heartfelt compassion, who are capable of offering the very best to others; the best, not what is left over: the best!

 

Dear young people, in these days Poland, this noble land, is in a festive mood; in these days Poland wants to be the ever-youthful face of mercy. From this land, with you and all those young people who cannot be present today yet join us through the various communications media, we are going to make this World Youth Day an authentic Jubilee celebration, in this Jubilee of Mercy.

 

In my years as a bishop, I have learned one thing, well, I have learned many, but I want to share one with you now: nothing is more beautiful than seeing the enthusiasm, dedication, zeal and energy with which so many young people live their lives. This is beautiful! And where does this beauty come from? When Jesus touches a young person’s heart, he or she becomes capable of truly great things. It is exciting to listen to you share your dreams, your questions and your impatience with those who say that things cannot change. Those whom I call “quietists”: “nothing can change”. No, young people have the strength to challenge them! But… maybe some are not so sure about this… I ask you, and you respond: can things change? [Yes!] I cannot hear you! [Yes!] That’s good. For me, it is a gift of God to see so many of you, with all your questions, trying to make a difference. It is beautiful and heart-warming to see all that restlessness! Today the Church looks to you, and I would add, the world looks to you, and wants to learn from you, to be reassured that the Father’s Mercy has an ever-youthful face, and constantly invites us to be part of his Kingdom, it is a Kingdom of joy, a Kingdom always joyful, always driving us forward, a Kingdom able to give us the strength to change things. I have forgotten and so I repeat my question to you: can things change? [Yes!] Agreed.

 

Knowing your enthusiasm for mission, I repeat: mercy always has a youthful face! Because a merciful heart is motivated to move beyond its comfort zone. A merciful heart can go out and meet others; it is ready to embrace everyone. A merciful heart is able to be a place of refuge for those who are without a home or have lost their home; it is able to build a home and a family for those forced to emigrate; it knows the meaning of tenderness and compassion. A merciful heart can share its bread with the hungry and welcome refugees and migrants. To say the word “mercy” along with you is to speak of opportunity, future, commitment, trust, openness, hospitality, compassion and dreams. But are you able to dream? [Yes!] When the heart is open and able to dream, there is room for mercy, there is room to caress those who suffer, there is room to draw close to those who have no peace of heart or who do not have the bare necessities to live, or who do not have the most beautiful thing of all: the faith. Mercy. Let us together repeat this word: mercy. All of you! [Mercy!] Again! [Mercy!] And once more, so the whole world can hear you! [Mercy!].

 

Let me tell you another thing I have learned over these years. I do not want to offend anyone, but it pains me to meet young people who seem to have opted for “early retirement”. This pains me. Young people who seem to retire at 23, 24, 25 years of age. This pains me. I worry when I see young people who have “thrown in the towel” before the game has even begun, who are defeated even before they begin to play. I am saddened to see young people who walk around glumly as if life had no meaning. Deep down, young people like this are bored… and boring, who bore others, and this upsets me. But it is also hard, and troubling, to see young people who waste their lives looking for thrills or a feeling of being alive by taking dark paths and in the end having to pay for it… and pay dearly. Think of so many young people you know, who have chosen this path. It is disturbing to see young people squandering some of the best years of their lives, wasting their energies running after peddlers of false illusions, and they do exist, (where I come from, we call them “vendors of smoke”), who rob you of what is best in you. This pains me. I am sure that among you there are no such persons, but I want to tell you: there are young people that have gone into retirement, who have thrown in the towel before the game has even begun, there are young people who are enthralled by false illusions and end up in nothingness.

 

We are gathered here to help one another, because we do not want to be robbed of the best of ourselves. We don’t want to be robbed of our energy, our joy, our dreams by false hopes.

 

So I ask you: are you looking for empty thrills in life, or do you want to feel a power that can give you a lasting sense of life and fulfilment? Empty thrills or the power of grace? What do you want: deadening thrills or the power of fullness? What do you want? [the power of fullness!] I cannot hear you very well. [the power of fullness!] To find fulfilment, to gain new life, there is a way, a way that is not for sale, that cannot be purchased, a way that is not a thing or an object, but a person. His name is Jesus Christ. I ask you: can you buy Jesus Christ? [No!] Can Jesus Christ be bought at the shops? [No!] Jesus Christ is a gift, a gift from the Father, the gift from our Father. Who is Jesus Christ? All together! Jesus Christ is a gift! All together! [He is a gift!] He is the Father’s gift.

 

Jesus can give you true passion for life. Jesus can inspire us not to settle for less, but to give the very best of ourselves. Jesus challenges us, spurs us on and helps us keep trying whenever we are tempted to give up. Jesus pushes us to keep our sights high and to dream of great things. You might say to me, “but Father, it is so difficult to dream of great things, it is so difficult to rise up, to be always moving forwards and upwards. Father, I am weak, I fall, and I try but so many times I fall down”. Mountaineers, as they climb mountains, sing a very beautiful song whose words go like this: “in the art of climbing, it is not important that you do not fall down, but that you do not stay down”. If you are weak, if you fall, look up a little for there is Jesus’ hand extended to you as he says: “Rise up, come with me”. “And what if I fall again?” Rise again. “And what if I fall yet again?” Rise yet again. Peter once asked the Lord: “Lord, how many times?” And the reply came: “seventy times seven”. The hand of Jesus is always extended, ready to lift us up again when we fall. Do you understand? [Yes!]

 

In the Gospel, we heard how Jesus, on his way to Jerusalem, stopped at a home – the home of Martha, Mary and Lazarus – and was welcomed. He stopped, went in and spent time with them. The two women welcomed him because they knew he was open and attentive. Our many jobs and responsibilities can make us a bit like Martha: busy, scattered, constantly running from place to place… but we can also be like Mary: whenever we see a beautiful landscape, or look at a video from a friend on our mobile phone, we can stop and think, stop and listen… In these days, Jesus wants to stop and enter our home: your home, my home, enter into our hearts; Jesus will look at us hurrying about with all our concerns, as he did with Martha… and he will wait for us to listen to him, like Mary, to make space for him amid the bustle. May these be days given over to Jesus and to listening to one another. May they help us welcome Jesus in all those with whom we share our homes, our neighbourhoods, our groups and our schools.

 

Whoever welcomes Jesus, learns to love as Jesus does. So he asks us if we want a full life. And in his name, I ask you: do you want a full life? Start right this moment by letting yourself be open and attentive! Because happiness is sown and blossoms in mercy. That is his answer, his offer, his challenge, his adventure: mercy. Mercy always has a youthful face. Like that of Mary of Bethany, who sat as a disciple at the feet of Jesus and joyfully listened to his words, since she knew that there she would find peace. Like that of Mary of Nazareth, whose daring “Yes” launched her on the adventure of mercy. All generations would call her blessed; to all of us she is the “Mother of Mercy”. Let us call upon her together: Mary, Mother of Mercy. All of us: Mary, Mother of Mercy.

 

All together, let us ask the Lord, each repeating in the silence of his or her heart: “Lord, launch us on the adventure of mercy! Launch us on the adventure of building bridges and tearing down walls, be they barriers or barbed wire. Launch us on the adventure of helping the poor, those who feel lonely and abandoned, or no longer find meaning in their lives. Launch us on the journey of accompanying those who do not know you, and telling them carefully and respectfully your Name, the reason for our faith. Send us, like Mary of Bethany, to listen attentively to those we do not understand, those of other cultures and peoples, even those we are afraid of because we consider them a threat. Make us attentive to our elders, to our grandparents, as Mary of Nazareth was to Elizabeth, in order to learn from their wisdom. I ask you: do you speak to your grandparents? [Yes!] That is good! Seek your grandparents, they have the wisdom of life and can tell you things that will stir your hearts.

 

Here we are, Lord! Send us to share your merciful love. We want to welcome you in our midst during this World Youth Day. We want to affirm that our lives are fulfilled when they are shaped by mercy, that this is the better part, the sweetest part, and that it will never be taken from us.

Pope Francis in Poland: Meeting with the volunteers & the organizing Committee

Pope Francis in Poland: Holy Mass

Pope Francis in Poland: Prayer Vigil

Pope Francis in Poland: Way of the Cross

Pope Francis in Poland: Welcome Ceremonny at Błonia

Mass opening World Youth Day

Krakow

Cracovia, Cracovia, Poland